Skip to main content

About your Search

20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
is willing to do. >> beware, there's a fiscal cliff ahead, but there's still no plan from the president on how to cut spending. >> made a mistake, but i didn't. almost 18, almost 20 years ago. >> a former democratic representative who was convicted of having sex with an underage girl says he's back, and he's running for congress. all of that, plus a shocking new report that gitmo detainees may be coming to america. "hannity" starts right here, right now. new troubles for u.n. ambassador susan rice this as questions surface about her time at the state department when al-qaeda bombed two african embassies in the late '90s, and how the situation parallels what happened prior to the terror attack in benghazi that left four americans dead. yesterday republican senator susan collins met with ambassador rice for 90 minutes, and after the closed-door meeting the senator questioned rice's role at the state department back in 1998 when she served as the assistant secretary of state for african affairs in the clinton administration. watch this. >> those bombings in 1998 resulted in the loss of lif
of the fiscal cliff negotiations. the mortgage interest deduction. government spending on this will reach $100 million by 2014, making it the third largest tax break on the books. who does it help? 41 million people. the most recent irs data showed that 41 million people claimed this deduction on their 2010 tax returns. the tax policy center says it tends to benefit upper middle class families the most. these bars show income in the circles the average savings. for those with incomes of less than $40,000 a year, their savings is $91, look at the people who make $250,000 and more. their average savings is about $5500. this benefits people most on both coasts and cities like chicago, with higher property prices, and we watch the fiscal cliff negotiations closely for what could happen next to this tax goody next year. >> here's the question i'm hearing people ask, if we go off the cliff here, how big a hit will we take on taxs? stand by, because i'm about to give you the closest answer i possibly can. to help me with that is laurie montgomery, she is the fiscal policy reporter for the washington
left to make a deal before the country hits what's called the fiscal cliff. that's a combination of across the board tax increases for everyone, coupled with cuts in spending like defense, education, health care, and housing assistance. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin with the very latest. jessica? >> reporter: president obama has now personally turned down speaker boehner's opening offer to avert the fiscal cliff. he did it in a tv interview. what does president obama think of speaker boehner's proposal to avert the fiscal cliff? >> unfortunately, the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks about $800 billion worth of revenues but says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> reporter: he won't agree to eliminate a tax deduction for contributions to charity. >> every hospital and university and nonfor profit agency across the country would find themselves on the verge of collapse. so that's not a realistic option. >> reporter: but the president didn't say all this to speaker
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)